How to Be a Healthy Vegetarian


With all the options and features this theme offers, we do not forget WordPress heart - blogging. We made sure you receive great experience. Choose between different blog page layouts, select headers, create ... Read more

Why Breakfast Is Important ( Multipage )


Ut luctus lacus elit. In ligula augue, pulvinar eget dignissim a, blandit eget dolor. Cras eleifend urna eget diam tempor vel luctus ligula eleifend. Suspendisse eros massa, suscipit vitae mollis eget, mattis vel elit ... Read more

Smart Food Shopping ( With Read More Tag )


The Power of Choice! We have the power of choice to decide which foods to buy at the grocery store. Making the healthiest food choices when shopping and eating out is a key to consuming a well-balanced diet. Guidelines for Read more

How to Be a Healthy Vegetarian

Steve Banjoko Articles Leave a comment  
Selection Of Fresh Vegetables

What is a vegetarian?

A vegetarian is someone who does not eat meat, including beef, chicken, pork, or fish and may or may not choose to eat other animal products such as eggs, milk, gelatin, or honey.

  • There are different types of vegetarian diets.
  • Eating a healthy vegetarian diet requires you to pay attention to certain nutrients.
  • You can definitely be a healthy vegetarian with a bit of work and education.

There are different types of vegetarians:

Flexitarian

Flexitarians are also known as semi–vegetarians. They avoid animal products most of the time, but will occasionally eat fish or meat.

Pesci–vegetarian

Pesci–vegetarians eat fish, dairy, and eggs but don’t eat meat or poultry.

Lacto–ovo vegetarian

Lacto–ovo vegetarians don’t eat meat, but do eat eggs and dairy products (ovo means eggs and lacto means dairy). This is the most common type of vegetarian diet.

Lacto vegetarian

Lacto vegetarians don’t eat meat or eggs, but do eat dairy products.

Ovo vegetarian

Ovo vegetarians don’t eat meat or dairy, but do eat eggs.

Vegan

Vegans avoid eating any animal products. They don’t eat any meat products, milk, cheese, eggs, honey, or gelatin. Many vegans (and some other types of vegetarians) choose not to wear clothes containing animal products, such as leather, wool, or silk, or wear makeup that may have been tested on animals.

Why do people decide to be vegetarian?

People decide to become a vegetarian for many reasons. Some common motivators include the environment, animal rights, and health. You may have different reasons. Deciding to become vegetarian is an individual decision.

Are vegetarian diets healthy?

Vegetarian diets can be very healthy and may even lower the risk of heart disease, Type 2 diabetes, and cancer. However, eating a balanced diet when you are vegetarian usually requires a little extra attention. Because vegetarians take out certain foods from their diets, they often need to work to add in foods that will provide the nutrients found in meat products. By eating a variety of foods including fruits, vegetables, legumes, nuts and seeds, soy products, and whole grains, vegetarians can get nutrients from non–meat sources. Vegetarians, especially vegans, need to pay attention getting enough iron, calcium, vitamin D, vitamin B12, and omega–3 fatty acids.

Carbohydrates provide energy and vitamins for your brain and muscles. Grain products, especially whole grains, are very important because they provide the carbohydrate, fiber, and many vitamins that your body needs. Vegetarians should be sure to eat a variety of whole grains such as whole wheat bread, pasta and tortillas, brown rice, bulgur, and quinoa.

Fat is needed by your body to stay healthy. Fat provides essential fatty acids and helps your body absorb certain vitamins. Excellent sources of healthy fats include nuts or nut butters, oils, and avocados.

Protein is needed for your muscles to grow. Vegetarians have to be careful not to just cut meat out of their diet, but to replace the meat with high–protein vegetarian foods. Nuts, nut butters (including peanut butter, almond butter, and sun butter), soy foods (such as tofu, soy milk, and edamame), legumes (such as beans, peas, hummus, and lentils), dairy foods (such as milk, yogurt, and cheese), and eggs all provide protein.

Zinc is important for growth and your immune system. Zinc is found in whole grains (refined grains such as bread or pasta made from white flour or white rice are not sources of zinc), fortified breakfast cereals, dairy products, soy foods, nuts, and legumes.

Iron is important for your blood and is found in beans, seeds, soybeans, tofu, fortified breakfast cereals, dark green leafy vegetables such as spinach, and dried fruit such as apricots, figs, or prunes. Plant–based iron is different from the iron found in meat and it’s not absorbed as well by your body. Adding vitamin C helps your body to absorb iron, so it’s important to eat foods rich in vitamin C (such as citrus fruits) and certain vegetables (such as tomatoes) as well.

Calcium is required to build strong bones. Calcium is found in dairy products such as milk, yogurt, and cheese. You can also find plant sources of calcium such as broccoli, butternut squash, collard greens, black beans, white beans, soybeans, and tofu. Plant sources of calcium have less calcium per serving than dairy products and fortified foods. Some foods aren’t naturally high in calcium but have calcium added to them; these foods are called calcium–fortified. Some products such as soy milk, enriched rice milk, orange juices, cereals, and cereal bars are calcium fortified. Look at the Nutrition Facts Label to find out which brands are highest in calcium.

Vitamin D is needed to absorb the calcium you eat and is necessary for strong bones. You can get vitamin D from the foods you eat, such as fortified dairy or soy milk products, fortified orange juice, egg yolks, or your body can make it from the sun. If you live in a place that gets very little sunshine, especially during the winter months, it’s harder to get enough vitamin D. To figure out if you live in one of these places, look at a map of the United States and imagine a line running between San Francisco and Philadelphia. If you live north of this line, it’s necessary for you (during the winter) to get your daily intake of vitamin D through food or supplements.

Vitamin B12 is only found in animal foods, so vegans must eat food fortified with B12. Examples include cow’s milk, eggs, nutritional yeast flakes, fortified soy milk, and fortified cereals. Your health care provider or nutritionist may also recommend supplemental vitamin B12 to make sure your body gets enough.

Omega–3 Fatty Acids are essential fatty acids. Vegans or vegetarians who don’t eat eggs must include other sources. You can find omega–3 fatty acids in walnuts, flaxseeds, canola oil, soybeans, or tofu.

Iodine is a mineral that helps your body’s metabolism. Plant–based diets can be low in iodine, so vegans should try to use iodized salt in recipes that call for salt. Seaweed (the type that wraps up sushi) is also a good source of iodine.

How can I convince my parents that being a vegetarian is healthy and right for me?

Your parents may be worried that you are choosing to follow a vegetarian diet without knowing how to do it in a healthy way. If you can explain your plans to stay healthy and your reasons for wanting to become a vegetarian, your parents may be more likely to understand. You still might need to give them time to accept your new diet. Read vegetarian cookbooks or nutritional information with your parents and offer to help with the shopping and cooking.

What are some essential foods vegetarians should keep in the kitchen?

Fruits

  • Citrus fruit
  • Melons
  • Strawberries
  • Apples
  • Dried fruit

Dark green leafy vegetables

  • Broccoli
  • Kale
  • Collard greens
  • Spinach

Dark orange or yellow vegetables

  • Carrots
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Winter squash

Legumes

  • Black, navy, pinto and/or white beans (canned or dry)
  • Lentils
  • Vegetarian baked or refried beans
  • Chickpeas
  • Hummus

Whole grains

  • Brown rice
  • Whole wheat bread, pasta, tortillas
  • Corn
  • Oats
  • Quinoa

Soy products

  • Calcium fortified soy milk
  • Tofu Edamame (young green soy beans)
  • Tempeh

Meat substitutes

  • Texturized vegetable protein (TVP)
  • Seitan (gluten based meat substitute)
  • Nuts and seeds
  • Veggie burgers (such as Morningstar®, Boca®, or Quorn®)

Why Breakfast Is Important ( Multipage )

Steve Banjoko Articles Leave a comment  
Breakfast

Kids Need Their Morning Meal :
While adults need to eat breakfast each day to perform their best, kids need it even more. Their growing bodies and developing brains rely heavily on the regular intake of food. When kids skip breakfast, they can end up going for long periods of time without food and this period of semi-starvation can create a lot of physical, intellectual, and behavioral problems for them.


Smart Food Shopping ( With Read More Tag )

Steve Banjoko Articles Comments Off

The Power of Choice!
We have the power of choice to decide which foods to buy at the grocery store. Making the healthiest food choices when shopping and eating out is a key to consuming a well-balanced diet.
Guidelines for a Healthy You

Healthy food choices are important for good health and well-being. Eating well means eating a variety of nutrient-packed foods and beverages from the food groups of MyPlate and staying within your calorie needs. This, combined with choosing foods low in saturated and trans fats, cholesterol, added sugars, and salt (sodium) will help to ensure that you are eating a healthy diet while helping to maintain a healthy weight. If you choose to drink alcoholic beverages, do so sensibly and in moderation.

For great information on how to meet these goals- both at home and when eating out, take a look at Let’s Eat for the Health of It (PDF|968 KB). This brochure is based on the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (the federal government’s science-based advice to promote health through nutrition and physical activity). View the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans here and visit MyPlate.gov for more guidance and tips for eating healthy.

Basic Healthy Shopping Skills

Keys for making your shopping the most healthful:

  • Know Your Store!
  • Bring a List!
  • Use the Facts!

KNOW YOUR STORE
Grocery stores have thousands of products, with most food items grouped together to make your decision-making easier. Many grocery stores have sections where foods are shelved much like the food groups of MyPlate.

The MyPlate food groups put foods with similar nutritional value together. These groups are:

  • Fruits
  • Vegetables
  • Grains
  • Milk (calcium-rich foods)
  • Meat and Beans (protein-rich foods)

Where are these food groups in your store?

 

Food Group Typical Store Location(s) Best Choices
Fruits Produce Aisle
Canned Goods
Freezer Aisle
Salad Bar
Variety! Fresh, Frozen, Canned and Dried Fruits.
Vegetables Produce Aisle
Canned Goods
Freezer Aisle
Salad Bar
Pasta, Rice & Bean Aisle
Variety! Fresh, Frozen and Canned (especially dark green and orange). Dry Beans and Peas.
Grains Bakery
Bread Aisle
Pasta & Rice Aisle(s)
Cereal Aisle
Whole Grains for at least half of choices.
Milk,Yogurt, & Cheese
(calcium-rich foods)
Dairy Case
Refrigerated Aisle
Non-Fat and Low-Fat Milk, Yogurt, Low-Fat and Fat-Free Cheeses
Meat and Beans
Fish,Poultry,Eggs,
Soy,& Nuts
(protein foods)
Deli
Meat & Poultry Case
Seafood Counter
Egg Case
Canned Goods
Salad Bar
Lean Meats, Skinless Poultry, Fish, Legumes (dried beans and peas), Nuts.

 

Don’t forget that your local farmers market is a great place for finding healthy foods, Find a Farmers Market in Your State.

Resources for making healthy food choices:

BRING A LIST
And stick to it! Healthy decisions start at home. Planning ahead can improve your health while saving you time and money. Before shopping, decide which foods you need, and the quantity that will last until your next shopping trip.

Consider creating a shopping list based on the MyPlate food groups to include a variety of healthy food choices. Think about your menu ideas when adding items to your list. Write your list to match the groups to the layout of your store.

Have everyone in your family make suggestions for the shopping list. Kids (and adults too!) are more willing to try new foods when they help to pick them.

USE THE FACTS
The Nutrition Facts that is! The Nutrition Facts panel on the food label is your guide to making healthy choices. Using the Nutrition Facts panel is important when shopping to be able to compare foods before you buy.

What are the facts? When reading the Nutrition Facts panel consider this:

Keep these Low: Look for More of these:
  • saturated fats
  • trans
  • fats
  • cholesterol
  • sodium
  • fiber
  • vitamins A, C, & E
  • calcium, potassium, magnesium & iron

** Use the %Daily Value (DV) column when possible: 5%DV or less is low, 20%DV or more is high.


Gym Workouts for Women

Steve Banjoko Articles Comments Off

Morbi quam libero, accumsan at vestibulum sed, semper id risus. Donec dapibus volutpat facilisis. Donec eu urna id nulla tincidunt euismod id ac mi. Pellentesque feugiat mi sed ligula blandit semper. Vivamus varius, tellus quis fermentum interdum, mauris quam rutrum arcu, id ultricies risus dolor nec metus. Aenean elit leo, egestas at dignissim quis, facilisis at dolor. Suspendisse potenti. Fusce tincidunt nunc et sapien malesuada quis rutrum dui rutrum. Maecenas vulputate iaculis elit, condimentum vulputate purus laoreet ut. Curabitur luctus fermentum metus, quis aliquet massa laoreet ut. Praesent tristique euismod est, vitae convallis eros blandit quis. Aenean non tincidunt massa. Etiam facilisis tempus leo eu scelerisque. Integer rutrum sagittis nibh in ullamcorper. Morbi tempus velit vitae erat sodales ac ultrices dui ultricies. Sed porttitor lobortis odio.

Read more


Post entry 1

Steve Banjoko Shortcode Leave a comment  

Post entry 2

Steve Banjoko Shortcode Leave a comment  

Post entry 3

Steve Banjoko Shortcode Leave a comment  

Post entry 4

Steve Banjoko Shortcode Leave a comment